David WrightUnderstanding Cultural Taste Sensation, Skill and Sensibility

Palgrave Macmillan, 2015

by Dave O'Brien on February 2, 2016

David Wright

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What is cultural taste? How is it formed, imagined and patterned? In Understanding Cultural Taste  Sensation, Skill and Sensibility (Palgrave MacMillan, 2015), David Wright, Associate Professor at the University of Warwick,  explores the theories and practices framing cultural taste in contemporary society in order to account for the social role of cultural taste. The book explains how taste is made knowable, through quantification and measurement, moves through an explanation of differing cultural taste patterns, including the all important figure of the omnivore, and narrates the impact of technology on cultural taste. The book accounts for the governing and globalisation of cultural taste, thinking through the rise of cosmopolitan tastes, as well as engaging with ideas about taste and expertise. The book uses a range of examples, including detailed discussions of contemporary art works such as Greyson Perry's The lovely consensus. Although grounded in sociology, the book speaks to debates, and thus to readers, from across arts and cultural subjects.

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