Vernadette V. GonzalezSecuring Paradise: Tourism and Militarism in Hawai’i and the Philippines

Duke University Press, 2013

by Christopher Patterson on September 22, 2014

Vernadette V. Gonzalez

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Asian American StudiesVernadette Vicuna Gonzalez‘s Securing Paradise: Tourism and Militarism in Hawai’i and the Philippines (Duke University Press, 2013), examines the intertwined relationship between tourism and militarism in Hawai’i and the Philippines. Dr. Gonzalez questions dominant narratives of tourism as a tool of development by focusing on tourism as a means of both signifying and legitimating types of security provided by American military forces. Dr. Gonzalez uses an archive that includes literary works, travel brochures, highways, military bases and travel tours, in order to expose how tourism thrives on feelings of nostalgia, heroism and international brotherhood.

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